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Guest Post: 5 Simple Ways to Pull Your Marriage Out of A Stall

In my series on Christian marriage, I was honored to have Jenny from My Autumn Reflections hop over and share her wise words of counsel on marriages stuck in a rut.

At My Autumn Reflections,  Jenny blogs about parenting, marriage, a relationship with God, life skills, healing from past hurts, establishing healthy boundaries in relationships and more.

Please join me today by reading her article;

5 Simple Ways to Pull Your Marriage Out of A Stall

 

Is your marriage stalled?

Are you both living in your own world, communicating about essentials only – weather, money, schedules, kids?  Does your physical intimacy lack connection and passion? Maybe you have no sex at all? Are arguments followed by stiff silence your “normal”?  Have you stopped laughing together and sharing jokes?

When neither partner is meeting the needs of their spouse, marriage stalls.  A negative cycle of neglect results in empty hearts and dry formalities – like that boring kiss on the cheek as you rush out the door to work. 

The failure to meet each other’s needs is often unintentional, but the reaction to unmet needs may develop into intentional hurt.  Couples may begin to react to their pain by hurting their spouse.  If this is the case, it’s time to make a change.  And quick.

Note:  If your marriage has taken a blow because of serious sin in a spouse – adultery, pornography, abuse, addiction – you need “intensive care”.  Serious sin must be dealt with seriously.  This post is for couples whose marriages have drifted into mediocrity through neglect.

If your marriage is stalled, here are five things you can do to kickstart it:

  1. Pray together.  Whether you feel like it or not.  Praying is one of the most intimate things a couple can do together.  It reveals your deepest thoughts and brings hope for resolution of conflict in your marriage.  If you go around in circles when trying to solve problems, stop and pray together.  By doing this you are seeking help from the Master Psychologist.  He knows just how to solve your problem and will guide you to answers.

Richard and I have often resorted to praying when our discussions stalled.  The answer did not always come right away, but it did come.  Continue to pray – together.  This reaffirms your commitment to each other and your marriage even though your conflict is unresolved.

Practical Application:  Make a time to pray together as a couple – at least once a day.  Pray specifically for your relationship.

  1. Choose to meet each other’s needs. Whether you feel like it or not. It takes an emotionally mature human being to give with no strings attached. Giving because you are receiving is reactive giving.  Start giving out of choice and not because your needs are being met.

Find out what your spouse’s needs are. Sit yourselves down and have a conversation about your marriage and the needs you each have.   Then start meeting those needs.

Practical Application:   Ask your spouse to tell you three things you can do to make him/her feel loved and appreciated.  Let him/her do the same for you.  Then do those things.

  1. Commit to the long haul. You’re not going to fix in five minutes what you have spent 10 or 15 years breaking.  Be patient.  Be prepared to work hard at your marriage for a long time. There is no instant solution to the problems you face.  You need  honest communication, hard work from both of you, and a commitment to never leave.

Practical Application:  Verbally confirm your longterm commitment to your spouse.  Tell them you are in this relationship for the long haul. You are not giving up.

  1. Change your thinking. Get rid of hopeless thoughts that your marriage is over and that nothing is going to remedy it.  Choose to think positive thoughts about your marriage and your spouse. Thoughts and feelings lead to actions, so begin with changing your thinking.

Practical Application:  Make a list of things you appreciate about your spouse.  Review them daily.  Thank God for them. When you are tempted to focus on the negative in your spouse, go back to your list!

  1. Commit to working on yourself first. No one can force change in someone else.  The only person you can change is yourself.  Take ownership of your faults in the relationship and work on being a better spouse.  Pray daily that God will reveal the things you need to change in your relationship – it may be an irritating habit, wrong thought patterns, or a change of attitude.

Practical Application:  Prayerfully make a list and begin working to cultivate opposite traits of character in yourself.   Instead of criticism cultivate affirmation of your spouse, replace irritability with cheerfulness, instead of neglecting household chores, do them at once.

 

God intended marriage to be a place of safety, companionship, friendship, fun, passion, and growth.

Do something about your stalled relationship today.

Don’t settle for mediocre.

 

Is your relationship stalled?  Have you settled for mediocre?  What’s the most important thing in this list for you to do? 

 

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